Is there soy in Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon or Lipton Black Tea?

Unless you happen to be standing next the package of prepared foods, it can sometimes be quite difficult to find allergy / ingredient information on many food items.

When we’re researching food ingredients, we’re stunned at how many food manufacturers don’t have basic ingredient / allergen information posted on their websites. You’d think of everybody out there, the people who actually make and sell the stuff would have that information handy. More often that not, we end up finding ingredient information on a retail site or a health and wellness site.

That’s definitely the case with Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon. Carolina Pride apparently takes no pride in maintaining ingredient lists on their website. I finally found some useful information, on, of all places, walmart.com. I wasn’t able to find the exact “low sodium” variety, but in light of the facts that a) none of their bacon varieties had soy and b) I’ve never seen real bacon with soy in it, I’d feel comfortable allow our kids to eat Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon.

Bonus tidbit: “bacon bits” are generally not 100% bacon and do have soy, most likely in the form of textured vegetable protein (the vegetable protein that is being texture, is, of course, soy).

As far as whether or not Lipton Black Tea has soy in it, that’s yet another mystery if you don’t have the package. Lipton doesn’t list ingredients on their website, and all of my searches did not turn up a useful ingredient list for Lipton Black Tea. That said, I can probably guess a pretty reliable answer for you. If it’s just plain black tea, it is most likely fine. The catch is, the moment you add any kind of flavoring to it, soy is going to come along for the ride. I found the ingredient list for some of Lipton’s flavored black teas, and pretty much every one of them had soy in it.

So, to sum up, you’re probably okay with the Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon, but if the Lipton Black Tea has any other flavor with it, I’d bet money that it’s got soy.




I'm trying to track allergen information for every restaurant that we eat at. With my son's soy allergy, each time we eat at a restaurant, it can take up to 30 minutes to figure out what he can eat. Especially since most restaurants don't accurately represent their usage of soy.

We're tracking what soy free (including soybean oil free) foods our son can eat at all restaurants we go to. If you've got a soy allergy in your family and have any information you can share, please contact us.

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