Category Archives: Questions and Answers

Where I can find soy free bread and pizza in my area?

Miss Green asked: “Where I can find soy free bread and pizza in my area?”

Unfortunately, we can’t be a lot of help when it comes to bread, as it seems that pretty much 100% of all commercially available bread and buns have soybean oil in them. We pretty much have to depend on my wife baking bread or visiting a local artesian bakery to get bread or buns that the kids can eat. Update 6/22/2015 — Aldi’s actually carries 8 different types of bread that are soy free.
Pizza is almost as hopeless, but there is one nationwide option: Donato’s Pizza has a gluten free pizza that uses Udi’s gluten free crust which is conveniently also soy free. So if there’s a Donato’s Pizza in your neck of the woods, head on over there right away. Aside from Donato’s, every national chain we’ve researched uses soybean oil in their crust and often in their sauce.



I'm trying to track allergen information for every restaurant that we eat at. With my son's soy allergy, each time we eat at a restaurant, it can take up to 30 minutes to figure out what he can eat. Especially since most restaurants don't accurately represent their usage of soy.

We're tracking what soy free (including soybean oil free) foods our son can eat at all restaurants we go to. If you've got a soy allergy in your family and have any information you can share, please contact us.

please list every fast food or chain restaurant and baked goods that are soy free

Melissa asked us to tell her “every fast food or chain restaurant and baked goods that are soy free”.

Well, Melissa, I wish I knew! 🙂 Seriously, trying to answer that exact question is what led to the creation of this website. Unfortunately pretty much every national restaurant has soy in a large percentage of their offerings. The most notable exception would be Chipotle, and Donato’s gluten (and conveniently soy) free pizza.

Rumor has it that Panera Bread is starting to carry some baked goods that are soy free, but I have not had the opportunity to check them out personally. Unfortunately, between the shortening or the frosting, pretty much every baked good made in America is going to have soy in it. If you’re looking for not-made-by-yourself baked goods, your best bet is going to be a local artesian bakery that realizes that soybean oil is not a requirement when baking.




I'm trying to track allergen information for every restaurant that we eat at. With my son's soy allergy, each time we eat at a restaurant, it can take up to 30 minutes to figure out what he can eat. Especially since most restaurants don't accurately represent their usage of soy.

We're tracking what soy free (including soybean oil free) foods our son can eat at all restaurants we go to. If you've got a soy allergy in your family and have any information you can share, please contact us.

Is there soy in Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon or Lipton Black Tea?

Unless you happen to be standing next the package of prepared foods, it can sometimes be quite difficult to find allergy / ingredient information on many food items.

When we’re researching food ingredients, we’re stunned at how many food manufacturers don’t have basic ingredient / allergen information posted on their websites. You’d think of everybody out there, the people who actually make and sell the stuff would have that information handy. More often that not, we end up finding ingredient information on a retail site or a health and wellness site.

That’s definitely the case with Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon. Carolina Pride apparently takes no pride in maintaining ingredient lists on their website. I finally found some useful information, on, of all places, walmart.com. I wasn’t able to find the exact “low sodium” variety, but in light of the facts that a) none of their bacon varieties had soy and b) I’ve never seen real bacon with soy in it, I’d feel comfortable allow our kids to eat Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon.

Bonus tidbit: “bacon bits” are generally not 100% bacon and do have soy, most likely in the form of textured vegetable protein (the vegetable protein that is being texture, is, of course, soy).

As far as whether or not Lipton Black Tea has soy in it, that’s yet another mystery if you don’t have the package. Lipton doesn’t list ingredients on their website, and all of my searches did not turn up a useful ingredient list for Lipton Black Tea. That said, I can probably guess a pretty reliable answer for you. If it’s just plain black tea, it is most likely fine. The catch is, the moment you add any kind of flavoring to it, soy is going to come along for the ride. I found the ingredient list for some of Lipton’s flavored black teas, and pretty much every one of them had soy in it.

So, to sum up, you’re probably okay with the Carolina Pride Low Sodium Bacon, but if the Lipton Black Tea has any other flavor with it, I’d bet money that it’s got soy.




I'm trying to track allergen information for every restaurant that we eat at. With my son's soy allergy, each time we eat at a restaurant, it can take up to 30 minutes to figure out what he can eat. Especially since most restaurants don't accurately represent their usage of soy.

We're tracking what soy free (including soybean oil free) foods our son can eat at all restaurants we go to. If you've got a soy allergy in your family and have any information you can share, please contact us.

Soy in Olive Garden menu?

A reader asked, is there “Soy in Olive Garden menu?”

Unfortunately, we haven’t gotten to try to order at an Olive Garden restaurant, but I can make some pretty good educated guesses. First by looking at their allergen guide, you can see that pretty much everything is marked as containing soy. I can’t tell if they subscribe to the “soybean oil isn’t made out of soy“, but considering the sheer number of items that are marked as containing soy, it makes me think that they may be listing items with soybean oil in them also. I would assume, like most Italian Restaurants, they put soybean oil on their cooked pasta to keep it from sticking together. Many Italian Restaurants also end up using soybean oil in their pasta sauces, too.

Because of this information, we’ve never even bothered to darken the door of an Olive Garden because we’re pretty much 100% sure that there will nothing they can eat.

Olive Garden allergen guide (Printed information is valid: 06/01/2015 – 07/05/2015)

 




I'm trying to track allergen information for every restaurant that we eat at. With my son's soy allergy, each time we eat at a restaurant, it can take up to 30 minutes to figure out what he can eat. Especially since most restaurants don't accurately represent their usage of soy.

We're tracking what soy free (including soybean oil free) foods our son can eat at all restaurants we go to. If you've got a soy allergy in your family and have any information you can share, please contact us.